Disabled Friendly Bathrooms (Modern)

There are different bathrooms for different needs, so you must take into consideration the needs of you and your partner. A long-term impairment, sudden illness or injury can make a bathroom renovation disability friendly a necessity.  Unfortunately, most bathrooms were designed and built without considering accessibility issues for persons with limited mobility. This post will give you ideas for modern changes for anyone who is disabled or are thinking into the future we try to not only make your bathroom practical but something you can show off to your friends and family. Below are 4 easy tips to take into consideration when designing your injury/impairment bathroom.

  1. Layout

The layout is probably the most crucial part of the renovation if we are starting from scratch. To put it simply you want easy access to everything that is used in the bathroom. Straight lines are crucial now below is the simplest example. You enter and can either go left for the shower or right for the vanity. I will get into later about certain fixtures that will make it even better but the layout is crucial about archiving something practical for your injury or disability.

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Disabled Bathroom Before

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Disabled Friendly Bathroom After

2. Railing For Safety Installed In Correct Places

Safety rails or grip bars are relatively inexpensive to purchase and greatly improve bathroom safety for the disabled or anyone with limited mobility.

The shower, or tub area, requires hand or safety rails to help injured or disabled persons safely enter and exit.  For tub access, install safety rails at sitting and standing height at the point of exit and entry to the bath.

And, depending on the disability and specific needs, safety rails may also be added in other strategic locations to improve overall bathroom accessibility.  We strongly recommend professional installation to ensure proper placement and mounting of safety rails for maximum safety and bathroom accessibility. It’s import to note that the sliding shower rails we often install into bathroom should never be used to grab as they may break if yanked yard from a falling person. Below is a modern example of a bathroom renovation we did in Perth to help a person who had become disabled through a recent injury. They wanted it to be functional but look nice.

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3. Non Slip Tiles

Reducing the risk of falling is one of the main objectives of any disabled bathroom renovation project.  Mats both at the point of entry/exit and in the tub itself dramatically reduce the risk of falling or injury.  To improve disabled shower safety, also consider installing special non-slip flooring.  Although more expensive than the mats, non-slip flooring provides added traction for users throughout the shower area and greatly enhances shower accessibility for the disabled or anyone with balance issues.

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Below is a list of further questions to ask your self.
• Is the bathroom door big enough to enter thought in a wheelchair?
• Is the bathroom big enough or do you need to use an alternative room?
• Will you need safety covers for light switches or power points + Drains
• Will you need a fold down seat and grab rails?
• What type of flooring do you need? Do you need Altro Safety Flooring, a type of vinyl hospitals use or tiles?
• Will you need a bath? (Bath tub that is low and accessible)
• Will you need a toilet with grab rails?
• Will you need a sink that will allow you to use a wheelchair up close?

We have only glossed over this in this post but we will into specifics in later posts that will help you or a loved one a safer bathroom renovation for the disabled or injured.

For More DIY Tips For Renovating Your Bathroom Visit:
Website: http://www.ontheballbathrooms.com.au
Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/ontheballbathrooms
High-resolution examples of all projects: https://www.houzz.com.au/pro/ontheball
Keep up with us on Instagram: instagram/ontheballbathroom

 

 

 

 

 

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